Tech found in iPhone X could usher in ‘lightspeed’ broadband in cities

A team of European researchers has found a way to take technology from the latest iPhone and use it to generate unparalleled broadband speeds.

One of the major selling points of the iPhone X was its user recognition software, capable of scanning your face and creating an Animoji, or turning on music when its AirPod earbuds sense they’ve been placed in your ears.

Behind this technology is something called a vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser (VCSEL), a specialised laser diode that is cheap to manufacture and significantly more energy-efficient than traditional lasers.

Now, a team of EU-funded researchers has managed to find a way to use VCSELs to create ultra-high-speed broadband across large distances, potentially doing away with the data bottlenecks experienced in cities that are only set to increase as the years go on.

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The exchequer, SMEs and retailers are missing out on millions of euro in potential revenue because of stalled progress on the National Broadband Plan (NBP)

The exchequer, SMEs and retailers are missing out on millions of euro in potential revenue because of stalled progress on the National Broadband Plan (NBP), according to industry figures as the Government remains coy on when the contract will finally be awarded.

Despite Minister for Communications, Denis Naughten saying the tender process for the contract was in its “final stages” in a series of answers to parliamentary questions since October 2017, there is still no date earmarked.

When asked if a timeframe for the contract to be awarded had been decided, the department said it was still in the process.

To read the full article jump over to the Irish Examiner

More than 100 Garda stations around Ireland have no internet access

A large quantity of Garda stations in Ireland are in need of an internet connection, according to Justice Minister Charlie Flanagan, TD.

Ireland’s digital divide presents an array of negative consequences and it looks as if law enforcement is being hit hard by the lack of connectivity.

Many Garda stations offline

According to a report in The Times published today (16 July), out of 564 operational Garda stations, 111 are offline, with 34 due to be connected later in 2018. The lack of an internet connection means the digital PULSE (Police Using Leading Systems Effectively) information system cannot be used in these stations. The PULSE system collects and stores information about crime, firearms licensing, traffic management, driving licences, insurance and character vetting.

Check out the full article here

 

Ireland has 36th slowest broadband speed in the world

Ireland has the 36th slowest broadband speed in the world.

Annual global rates have just been published showing we are just behind the UK, and just ahead of Austria.

More than 160 million tests were carried out across 200 countries to reveal that Singapore is still the fastest country.

It is followed by Sweden, Denmark and Norway, while Yemen has the slowest broadband worldwide.

Tech expert Jess Kelly says Ireland features in the middle of the table, but there are big differences in speeds within the country.

“The average download speed is 18.22Mbps. If you ask someone in Dublin city or Cork city what their speed is, they will be up there getting almost the 200 which you pay more, which is sensational,” she said.

“The fact of the matter is, there are still large pockets of this country that do not have access to broadband, never mind your high-speed broadband.”

Credit Irish Examiner

Vision for a Digital Ireland is not a pipe dream

Unfortunately, Ireland is still a two-speed digital economy when it comes to broadband infrastructure and cloud efficiency, writes John Kennedy.

Several years ago, Siliconrepublic.com ran a monthly newspaper supplement called Digital Ireland in a national publication, and it ran for the best part of a decade.

A decade ago, as Ireland plunged into recession and people scrambled for ideas, our contribution was to encourage Ireland to play to its strengths. With the support of the leaders of the biggest tech multinationals, we campaigned for a Digital 21 Strategy, a vision of an Ireland with digital sinews that lifted all boats and prospects from connectivity to skills, education, innovation and policy.

The idea was to create something that would be budgeted and deployed, something along the lines of Transport 21.

Click over to Silconrepublic to read the full article.