Tensions abound as broadband scheme enters crucial phase

Tensions abound as broadband scheme enters crucial phase.

 

Recently, the government inadvertently published some internal government documents revealing extra details on the cost and tension behind the National Broadband Plan rollout.

I say ‘inadvertently’ because the Government tried to redact the document but didn’t do it properly – anyone with a cursory knowledge of computers could unmask the black redacted strips.

One key issue revealed in the private memo was that the deal with Eir – to move 300,000 rural home and businesses out of the State’s 850,000-premise rollout intervention zone and into Eir’s own expedited rollout plans – will probably end up costing the State money and hit the rollout schedule, too.

“The department’s own subsidy modelling suggests that the smaller intervention area could lead to an increase in the overall cost of the state intervention,” said the document.

But how can covering an area with 550,000 premises cost more than an area of 850,000 premises?

They’re much harder to hook up, return less revenue and might face bridging tolls from Eir along the way.

“While intuitively it could be expected that a reduced intervention area would result in a lower subsidy, there are a number of factors putting upward pressure on the subsidy,” says the private position paper.

“The first arises because the reduction in the overall network build cost for the reduced intervention area is likely to be less than the reduction in revenues earned across the smaller number of premises. While there will be fewer premises to be connected in the reduced intervention area, these premises are in the more sparsely populated and hard-to-reach areas.

Read the full story here independent.ie

If National Broadband Plan will cost 60pc more, do we need a new plan?

If National Broadband Plan will cost 60pc more, do we need a new plan?

 

Ireland’s troubled intervention plan for broadband has hit some very serious speed bumps.

Ireland’s National Broadband Plan (NBP), geared to make Ireland the fibre testbed of Europe, is unravelling before our eyes.

The plan, costed at between €500m and €1bn (no one was ever clear on the figure), is now likely to cost 60pc more than what the politicians and civil servants predicted.

This is down to the cost of accessing Eir’s poles and ducts.

Dancing at the crossroads

The plan began with the best of intentions, and its coordinators, in their zeal, worked hard to make sure there were no gaps, no room for tribunals down the line, or any potential for accusations of favourable treatment for operators in the jealously contended race.

Its scope was vast. It aimed to bring a minimum of 30Mbps broadband to 750,000 postal addresses, 1.8m citizens, 96pc of the nation’s land mass and along 100,000km of road. An initial stimulus package of €275m was approved by Government up to 2020.

The first sign that the NBP, in its initial shape, was falling apart? The news that it was to be delayed, and that the final winners from the shortlist of Eir, Siro and Enet wouldn’t be announced in June 2017 as planned. Instead, it would be potentially delayed to late 2017, with construction starting in 2018, and the final citizens on the wrong side of the digital divide getting connectivity in 2023. Guess what? It is nearly late 2017!

The next sign that the plan was changing came in April when Communications Minister Denis Naughten, TD, signed a deal with Eir to target 300,000 homes in the intervention area – 890 communities – as part of a €200m deal with fibre on a commercial basis. This reduced the scope of the remaining plan to 542,000 premises, for 990,000 citizens (or 21pc of the population). The move created consternation among rival operators because it left them with the harder-to-reach areas and the feeling that Eir was gifted the low-hanging fruit.

Read the full story here. siliconrepublic.com

Government documents reveal cost of rural broadband could increase by a whopping 60%

The cost of rural broadband could rise by up to 60pc according to internal government documents.

 

Internal memos released under the Freedom Of Information Act show a feared National Broadband Plan price hike because of the government’s recent agreement with Eir to move 300,000 rural home and businesses out of the state’s 850,000-premise rollout intervention zone and into Eir’s own expedited rollout plans.

The rise in the scheme’s cost, which is already estimated to be over €500m, could come from Eir seeking fees from any winning bidder of the National Broadband Plan tender.

“The level of subsidy [that] bidders might seek for the reduced intervention area could increase by between 10pc and 15pc if an incremental cost is applied to infrastructure access, and by more than 60pc if the existing regulated price for pole and duct access is applied,” said the internal government memo setting out the government’s position.

“All three bidders have indicated that access to the new infrastructure built as part of the Eir 300,000 rural deployment, will be central to their bids. The cost to bidders of accessing this infrastructure in order to reach the Intervention Area is a critical factor that could significantly impact on the level of subsidy sought by bidders in the procurement process.”

The government wants Eir to charge a reduced price to this infrastructure while Eir insists that it is entitled to charge a market rate.

The increase in cost is likely to be absorbed by the taxpayer, as the government has promised that citizen access to state-subsidised rural broadband will not exceed average prices in urban areas.

Read the full story on the independent.ie