TV producer drives to nearby cattle shed to get a wifi connection

TV producer drives to nearby cattle shed to get a wifi connection

Garret Maguire has a successful film and TV production company, with commissions from channels throughout Ireland and Britain.

However, you will not find him or any of his six staff in their editing suite or studio in Co Cavan when they are ready to send packages to their clients.

The only place they can get a decent enough signal to use the internet is in a cattle shed on a neighbouring farm.

“It sounds ridiculous, doesn’t it?” said Garret, “but that’s the reality of life in rural Ireland for companies like ours.”

Having worked for Sky News, Garret left behind fibre-optic cables in Belfast for dial-up. He returned to his native county to start his own TV production company, Maguire Media, installing a state-of-the-art studio in Mountain Lodge, 10km north of Bailieborough.

However, he soon realised that simply getting online was going to be a nightmare.

Catch the full article here on the Irish Independent – http://bit.ly/1U7as1u

Article by Greg Harkin

Rural groups have pleaded with the Government to speed up its broadband roll-out, claiming firms are moving away because of the lack of internet available to one in three homes and businesses.

Firms move to cities as slow internet hits business

Rural groups have pleaded with the Government to speed up its broadband roll-out, claiming firms are moving away because of the lack of internet available to one in three homes and businesses.

A lot of companies are telling us they were waiting to see if they’d get broadband next year,” said Seamus Boland, chief executive of Irish Rural Link, which represents 500 community groups around the country.

But now that it’s been pushed out until 2022, they’re telling us that they’ve stayed in the sticks long enough and are moving to the city. We’re now looking at depopulation.

“Students who would normally come home are now staying in Dublin because they don’t have the internet at home,” he added.

The pleas come after a survey from Amarach Research and Vodafone revealed one-in-four rural residents would consider moving to urban areas because of broadband.

And Irish companies that were able to survive on low broadband speeds before say it is commercially unviable to do so anymore.

“Without a proper, fast internet connection we’re absolutely dead in the water,” said Seamus Quinn, managing director of MyItDepartment.ie, based in Athleague, Co Roscommon.

“Business has changed. We switched over to a cloud-based system last year. We were in Roscommon town and while the broadband was OK for a while, it was holding us back.”

Catch the full article here on the Irish Independent – http://bit.ly/1XZnbsR

Article by Adrian Wecklar

Depiction of Rural Ireland and the poor state of rural broadband

One in three Irish homes and businesses has little or no broadband. One in five say they have no access whatsoever.

Somewhere in an alternate universe, there is an Ireland where electricity was never fully rolled out to the whole country.

In all, one in three Irish homes and businesses has little or no broadband. One in five say they have no access whatsoever. And now people are starting to talk about abandoning their rural homes because of the broadband deficit.

“No broadband means no jobs and no village,” says Adam Coleman, an entrepreneur who set up a business in Lahinch but is now reassessing the location’s viability because of poor broadband availability.

“It’s getting very difficult to run a business off three megabits. Sometimes, our developers need to drive into Ennis to connect online.”

Catch the full article here on the Irish Independent – http://bit.ly/1sW05ru

Article by Adrian Wecklar

An Amarach survey reported that 25pc of those in rural Ireland now need the internet at home for work.

 

Kerry Farmer Rural Broadband

The absence of Rural Broadband is killing jobs.

For vast areas of rural Ireland, the absence of good broadband is proving to be nothing short of disastrous.

The absence of broadband is killing jobs.

It is a resource that has become as essential in Ireland as electricity and water, and the absence of good broadband is killing jobs in areas that desperately need recovery, paralysing schools and leaving farmers on the wrong side of the digital divide.

Catch the full article here on the Irish Independent – http://bit.ly/24eD1j5 

Article by Kim Bielenberg

Photography off Kerry dairy farmer Patrick Rohan with his son Liam on his farm outside Annascaul. Photo: Don MacMonagle.